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Self-care article


 “Self-care is all about you. It includes knowing about your health and taking simple lifestyle steps to being healthier, including eating healthily, taking regular exercise and dealing with common conditions as well as managing long term conditions effectively. 


Self-care is the best choice to treat minor illnesses and injuries. A large range of common illnesses and injuries can be treated at home simply with over-the-counter medicines and plenty of rest. 


What is self-care? 


Self-care means looking after yourself in a healthy way, whether it’s eating healthily, taking medicine when you have a cold, or doing some exercise. 


How can I self-care? 


Self-care includes the actions you take every day in order to stay fit and maintain good physical and mental health, meet your social and emotional needs, prevent and treat illness, and care more effectively for minor ailments. 


Can anyone help me to self-care? 


Your pharmacist can help you to stock up your medicine cabinet with remedies for minor ailments and illnesses. Some useful additions to your home first-aid kit include:


Painkillers for adults and children


Medicines to help with all kinds of tummy upsets


Tweezers and sharp scissors to remove splinters or cut bandages


A thermometer to check for fever


Antiseptic cream


Antiseptic wipes


A range of bandages, plasters, and dressings for minor cuts, sprains and bruises 


Why should I self-care? 


Keeping yourself fit and healthy can help protect you from illnesses like colds, flu and infections. Making lifestyle changes like quitting smoking or losing weight can also decrease your chances of getting a serious illness like cancer or heart disease. By caring for yourself, you’re helping to make sure NHS services are available for those that really need them. 


What if I don’t know if I can self-care? 


Advice is available free 24/7 on 111 and your pharmacist can also provide support and guidance.

Sickness Certificates

You do not require a doctor's sickness certificate for any illness lasting seven days or less. Your employer may however require you to complete a self-certification form (SC2) which is available from your employer or on the HMRC website.

Evidence that you are sick

If you are sick for more than seven days, your employer can ask you to give them some form of medical evidence to support payment of SSP (statutory sick pay).

Your employer can ask you to confirm that you've been ill.You can do this by filling in a form yourself when you return to work. This is called self-certification.

If you're sick and off work for more than seven days, your employer will probably ask for proof of your illness. Most employers ask for a fit note from your GP.

However, this will also depend on your employer's company policy on sick leave (or sickness absence). This policy should tell you how many days you can be off sick before you need to provide proof of illness or a fit note.

You could also provide evidence from someone who is not a medical practitioner, e.g. a dentist. Your employer will decide whether or not this evidence is acceptable. If your employer has any doubts, they may still ask for a medical certificate from your GP.

Statement of Fitness for Work - ’Fit Note'

The 'fit note' was introduced on 6 April 2010. With your employer's support, the note will help you return to work sooner by providing more information about the effects of your illness or injury.

For more information see the DirectGov website (where this information was sourced)



 
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