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Dr Carter is retiring from NPMC on 31st March 2017, he will be sadly missed by his colleagues and patients alike.  If you would like to leave a farewell comment for Dr Carter, please ask at Reception where we have a retirement book available for such messages.

Road Traffic Accidents

 

The background

 

 In 1995  the Road Traffic Act  changed the rules regarding road traffic accidents and the charging for care given.  In the past A&E used to charge for this, now this has moved to General Practice.  All UK motor insurance policies cover such fees and payment of such fees does not constitute any admission of liability.

 

 

 

Because of this we are now in a position of having to charge for this care, but the driver of the vehicle is able to claim this back from their motor insurer.

 

 

 

How this works




    • The driver of the vehicle at the time of the accident is liable for all costs (which they can then claim back from their motor insurer.) You will need to supply us with the drivers details.



 



    • This guideline does not include the care or recording of accidents for children under the age of 16



 



    • If you are attending an appointment with a Doctor within one working day of a road traffic accident for medical or surgical treatment or examination for injuries sustained the driver will be charged as follows:

 

    • Treatment - for each person treated over the age of 16 = £21.30



(If the doctor does a home visit then mileage will be charged - rate per mile or part of a mile (over 2 miles) = £0.41)

 

 



    • Where the purpose for attending a GP surgery or for a telephone consultation following an accident is to record injuries for future medico-legal purposes the charge for this is not covered by the Road Traffic Act and our charge is £21.30 per 10 minute appointment



 

 

We will inform you of this on booking the appointment if possible, or if not when you arrive for your appointment. 

 

 

 
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